NeanderGal and YodelMan is a spellbinding story of a Neanderthal, a human, and their forbidden love. They meet during the ice age, and fall in love across a glacier crevasse. Even from twenty meters apart, they know they are meant to be together. The first part of the movie concerns their efforts to cross the crevasse to each other. They finally manage to do so by corralling a migratory herd of mastodons into the crevasse and leaping across their backs, barely escaping being hammered by waving mastodon tusks and crushed between angry mastodon torsos.

Once NeanderGal and YodelMan are together, however, their families disapprove, and in the ice age, family is everything. They mollify the Neanderthal side of the family by pointing out YodelMan’s singular ability to yodel across mountainsides, a talent which, presumably, would transfer to their young, allowing them to keep in touch over long distances, trigger dangerous avalanches before they are underfoot, and entertain the family on long winter nights.

To gain the human family’s acceptance, they concoct a plan that would seemingly put the family patriarch in deadly danger. NeanderGal would step in and save his life, thereby ingratiating herself with him and the rest of the family. The plan goes awry when the patriarch notices that the sabertooth tiger pinning him down has been declawed as well as defanged. He softens, however, understanding that declawing and defanging a sabertooth tiger is no easy task, and having somebody around who can bring home claws and fangs for his necklaces would be good for his image. He could finally one-up that annoying cousin who always brought more sabertooth fang necklaces to the annual clan gatherings than he did.

The movie closes with NeanderGal and YodelMan walking hand in hand, NeanderGal hauling a mastodon tusk on her back, and YodelMan singing a tune oddly similar to one that would someday feature in the Sound of Music.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s